Results tagged ‘ White Sox ’

Sale can’t escape Cleveland

Chris Sale would like nothing more than to forget about his four starts made against the Indians during the 2013 season.

But it was difficult for this Cy Young-caliber hurler to even find an offseason escape from the 0-4 head-to-head record, 8.61 ERA and the six home runs and 34 hits allowed over 23 innings. When Sale took to the golf course during the past 3½ months at Worthington Country Club in Bonita Springs, Fla., where he is a member, the Indians’ drubbing followed him to the fairways and the green.

“It’s a funny story. The head pro, Don Tracy, he is a Cleveland fan,” Sale explained. “He was a fan before there were any fans.

“So going to play golf this offseason was bittersweet. I knew I was going to have a great time and play on a great course. But I also knew I was going to hear about it.”

When asked if he studied game film to figure out how to handle the Indians in ’14, the southpaw laughed and quickly replied that he burned all of that tape.

“That wasn’t fun,” said Sale, who is 2-4 with a 4.71 ERA lifetime against the Indians. “There was nothing pretty about me pitching vs. Cleveland. I tried to forget it but I still have that taste in my mouth and I’ll do what I can to not let it happen again.”

The White Sox would like to follow Sale’s lead. Cleveland became one of just five teams to claim 17 wins in a season against an opponent since the division era began in 1969. The White Sox dropped their last 14 this season to the Indians and finished at 2-17.

Blog Extra: More from Chris Sale

Here are a few more interesting takes from Chris Sale, as part of this Blog extra, to go with the southpaw’s comments on his 2014 preparation, his view on being considered an ace and the team’s new attitude already posted on whitesox.com.

COMFORT LEVEL WITH FLOWERS, PHEGLEY RETURNING AT CATCHER

“I thoroughly enjoyed having those guys as my batterymates. Tyler knows me better than I do, I believe. And with the amount of time I spent throwing to Phegley, we got to know each other better and better.”

WHITE SOX STATISTICS FROM 2013

“I don’t think you can set in stone or nail down what anyone did on the field last year. We don’t want to forget: remember the good and the bad. But I don’t think what anyone did on the field in 2013 should be held against them going into 2014. It’s a new year and new frame of mind. It’s a new set of rules, so let’s write our own book.”

ON BEING CONSIDERED THE FACE OF THE FRANCHISE

“I certainly appreciate the people who say that about me. But as long as Paul Konerko is in a White Sox uniform, there’s not a question that he is the face of the White Sox.”

ROSTER CHANGES MADE BY RICK HAHN

“I think it has been awesome. You never want to see your buddies go, both veteran guys and pitchers. But any time you have exciting players coming in, and you are restructuring the way the clubhouse and on-field demeanor will be, it only pumps you up. We have that with our core group of guys and the addition of great prospects and big time heavy hitters.”

JOSE ABREU

“I’m excited to see him hit … but not in live BP (where he could face Sale).”

LESSON LEARNED IN 2013

“Just competing. Being as far back as we were, giving it all you got and leaving it all on the field, in those scenarios, it’s sometimes easy to take a step back.

“When you get into August and September and you are out of contention, you are playing for pride and for yourself but also for the guy next to you. It’s the true meaning of grinding it out. You see the true colors of who people are.”

The Unabridged Paul Konerko

Since the end of Spring Training, Paul Konerko steadfastly has avoided talking about his future. His preference is and always has been to focus on baseball and address the personal stuff at the end of the season or in the postseason.

But on Friday afternoon, the consummate White Sox leader spoke for 23 minutes about his future with just two games left in this forgettable season. Aside from wanting to stay with the White Sox, being willing to play a part-time role only with the White Sox and most likely retiring after 2014, Konerko wasn’t able to provide any definitive assessment for the immediate future.

He came up with great analysis on the matter, as he has been doing for the past 15 years. Here’s many more of his quotes that didn’t make it into the story at MLB.com.

ON NOT AUTOMATICALLY ASSUMING HE’LL HAVE AN OPTION TO COME BACK

“I’m going to answer questions here but I just want to say it’s all under the premise that there’s a choice and an option that they want me back, that it’s all on the basis and set to the backdrop that there’s a choice here.

“I don’t know that. I haven’t talked to the White Sox formally, we haven’t spoken about anything. Under normal circumstances I hate to answer questions and speculate on things I don’t even know are questions yet.

“But I want everyone to know that I’m not sitting here knowing … everything could be made up for me. I don’t know what my choices are. I don’t know what my options are. I know none of that, so speculating on it seems kind of weird to me, but I understand the timing of these things, so I’m going to answer questions set to that there is that choice.

“A lot of players you guys deal with have that sense of entitlement that they’re always going to have that. That’s not the way I go.”

ON HANDLING ANOTHER YEAR PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY

“You never totally know. I can’t say yes. I feel like there are some things that you go through during a season that are kind of isolated things that you feel like, ‘OK, well that will never bother me again.’ There are other things that you just know, ‘Hey, that’s never going away. That’s going to hang around. Can I get through with it?’ But it’s one of those I’ll have to (consider) over the next month or so.

“Again it’s not just the playing of the games. It’s the travel. It’s the Spring Training. It’s the offseason. It’s all that stuff. You have to be able to absorb all of that work. I go back and forth on that kind of stuff because I’ve done this for almost 20 years professionally.

“You always can do a little more than you think, but it is a commitment, and at least for me, you want to be able to go out there. It’s one thing if you’re a utility infielder that’s kind of lost the ability to swing the bat (from) when you were a starting player, but you’re still defensively good or this or that, you can kind of get through easier. It’s not as big of a deal. Someone like me, I need to go out there and swing the bat every day, and to have to be able to do that, you have to think about those things.”

ON WHETHER PHYSICAL OR MENTAL PART PLAYS MORE INTO THE DECISION

“Physical is a bigger chunk of it. Mentally I think you can always rebound. This isn’t the first season I’ve had that’s been rough. There have been other ones. Part of that, the older you get, you can kind of let it go quicker and know that I could turn.

“I remember when I was younger, 10 years ago, I had a rough one, and really just thought it was the end of my career. I didn’t know how I was going to respond to that. I think you get better at that. You do get beat up more every year mentally, but I think ultimately, you get a little better at it. But physically, that’s the thing you have to know. It’s not just the season.

“If you could snap your fingers and know it was next Opening Day, and just knew you had the season, that’s tough. The seasons are tough, but when you talk about the offseason and Spring Training, those are big things, big things that you have to want to do. The season doesn’t start on April 1. It doesn’t start on Feb. 15. For me, it starts on Nov. 10, Nov. 15, somewhere right around then. So you have to know you’re willing to go from right then all the way until now. That’s a long year. So physically you have to know if you’re up for it.

ON PREFERRING TO FINISH AS A WHITE SOX PLAYER
 
“I don’t think there’s any doubt of that. I don’t know the options that are going to be made available to me, but I think that’s always been my goal. Certainly when I signed back here after ’05, I felt like that was it, and then after 2010, that just kind of locked it in. That’s definitely what I envision.

ON THE DECISION WEIGHING ON HIM THIS YEAR

“There are so many layers to the season that are bad, unfortunately. This is really the only season when you think about it, for me anyway, every season I’ve played before this, and when I say every season I mean since I was like seven, that I knew I would play the next year. I feel like if I do play, the one thing I can give you of any substance today probably would be that if I do play next year, that will probably be it.

“So that’s really what it boils down to. I would know the answer to that. This is the only one that would wind up being that I didn’t know the answer the whole way, and I don’t know if I handled that well, don’t know if I liked it. It’s not just the game. It’s not just the playing. When your whole entire year, everywhere you go, whether it’s to this city or that, there are so many relationships with people.

“Am I going to see this person again? Am I going to be back here? All of those little things that you guys can probably imagine, but there’s even more of them. (I was) in between on all of those, and I didn’t like that. Looking back on it, that was probably, I don’t want to say a mistake, but I don’t know if I was sure enough in Spring Training or before to say one way or the other, and maybe I should have figured things out more to say, ‘Listen, I plan on definitely playing beyond this year,’ or ‘This is it.’ It probably would have been a better year personally for me either way.

“But again that still doesn’t get around the fact that what’s happened with the rest of it. Some of this stuff, there’s a lot in your control, but there’s a lot out of your control. And this has just been a real rough year for everybody. I don’t know any guy on our team right now that hasn’t been eaten up by this team and what’s gone on here for three weeks or a month at one point during the season. It’s been a struggle. It’s been rough, and that can happen to anybody at any age.

ON ROUGH SEASON PLAYING INTO HIS DECISION

“It’s maybe the hugest thing. You only get to go through these kinds of things once, a career once, so you try to rely on advice from other people. You try to talk to the people who have been through it. The majority of them are always, ‘If you can play, play. Do it the way you want to do it. Go back to the drawing board. Go get ‘em.’ And I get all of that.

“The other side of it is, this is how careers are supposed to end. Not everybody gets to do it exactly how they want to do it. It’s supposed to kind of be not the best because that’s what closes you out. When you say, ‘OK, I’ve had enough of that, and they’ve had enough of me.’ So I can see it both directions. I can tell you more of me is the first one. And the advice I get is more the first scenario, but that doesn’t mean it’s right either. Going back to what I said, when that choice is put in front of me, if it is, that’s probably when I’ll have to think harder about it. We’re kind of talking now like it is.”

ON COMING BACK AS A PART-TIME PLAYER

“The only thing I can say on that would be the only place I could do that would be here because my family likes it here, my kids love it here, it’s a great place to be in the summer. I’ve been here. If I do come back in any capacity, even if I come back as, again, I don’t know the choices and all that, I think it’s going to be looked on, more importantly by myself, is that, I’m always holding myself to the standard that I’ve set, as far as the production I’ve had and what I’ve done.

“Other people are going to hold me to that, and I get that, but it’s probably not fair to myself to do that as much, and I’m going to have to come to grips that if I do play, I’ve got to kind of relax on that a little bit and know if I come back here, production can be done in a lot of different ways. It’s not always just driving in runs and hitting home runs.

“I’ve got to be better, if I’m going to come back, at working with the young guys and be better to them and be not so much consumed like I was 10 years ago. I’ve just been so, my head’s down and I just do what I do and I’m probably going to have to make adjustments on that kind of stuff to enjoy if I do come back. I think I could do it but I would definitely have to change some of my ways of the way I do things.”

ON PART-TIME VETERAN LEADERS BEING VALUABLE

“If I could allow it anywhere, it would be. Like what you said about going out the right way, if I did come back it’s not about that means I come back and I want to drive in 100 runs and I want to make an All-Star team. It’s not like that. It’s more just the vibe of how you want to feel when you go. And if that meant the plan from the beginning of the year was this, and Plan A, and you succeeded in that plan, that means that’s going out right.

“The guys you mentioned (Mark Kotsay, Jason Giambi), the role has to exist. I don’t know the roster, the way that’s going to shape up. That’s on Rick (Hahn) and all that. I’m very conscious of, I feel like I’ve always, since I’ve been a little kid, earned my way on to the playing field. No one did a favor for me. I always feel like I earned my way on. I’m not quite sure I can say that right now for next year. So that’s a problem with me, that’s a concern with me. The argument can be made that, well, OK, everything you’ve done up until now, regardless of this year, you have earned that.

“I don’t know the answer to that, but it definitely crosses my mind because I don’t want to put anybody in a tough spot that for other reasons that’s why I’m back here. If I’m back here, I want it to actually make sense. Assuming that I come to that conclusion that I want to play, that has to make sense for the other side because the White Sox have always been honest with me and treated me well. I’m not looking to power play somebody into a job. That’s just not who I am.”

ON FAMILY BEING A MAJOR PART OF HIS DECISION

“That’s another thing about next year. I’m going to have to look at going back to what I said, I’ve kind of always done things the same way. If I do play, I have to change the way like when I travel, I have to have the family come more with me to lessen the time away. Sometimes it’s tough with the school situations but that’s something that maybe the year or two I’ve dropped the ball on. I could have been a little bit more ahead because as your kids get older, you are missing stuff. But it wasn’t the way I do things. I’m going to have to be a little different. I’m going to have make adjustments how the way I do things because I’m a little set in my ways.

“That will be something I’ll have to address if I do play again. I have to go less time without seeing my kids, wife, all that kind of stuff.”

ON TEAM’S MISERABLE YEAR

“You know it’s possible in a sense that you see other organizations that turned. The Red Sox last year lost 90-something games. So, I’m sure that wasn’t what they had in mind. You know there are a lot of good teams now. So if you don’t get off right and these guys don’t play right or this guy gets hurt, anything is in play. I’m happy that in my 15 years it’s really the only one that was like this.

“The ’07 year I just don’t count along these lines because there were so many injuries it wasn’t even the real team that was playing most of that year. This year wasn’t quite, I can’t say that. We had our team a lot of the time and we just were bad.

“But I’m pretty lucky. 15 years in one spot. We had teams, I’ve been to the playoffs three times, which isn’t a ton. But we’ve had, you are into September every year being in it at least, maybe into the last week. That’s what you are looking for. There’s no guarantees you are ever going to make it to the playoffs. It’s always been pretty competitive.

“Definitely shocked. It was pretty much the same group of guys as last year. So I don’t think anybody saw this coming. I know there are a lot of people who thought we overachieved last year, but I don’t think they would have even said it was going to go this bad this year.”

Reed and White Sox hang on to victory

CHICAGO – The word or words White Sox closer Addison Reed uttered when Boston’s Will Middlebrooks made contact on a ninth-inning fastball Monday night at U.S. Cellular Field are not suitable for family viewers.

“I might have yelled a profanity,” said Reed, who could laugh about the 2-2 pitch after the White Sox held on for a 6-4 victory.

“He did hit it pretty well,” Reed continued. “I think it was the wind that kept it in. It was an out, and at the end of the day that’s all that matters.”

Middlebrooks’ blast sounded like a homer upon contact. It looked like a homer as it took off for the center field fence. And with Mike Napoli on first base and severe thunderstorms on their way, it could have made for an extended evening into morning.

But Alejandro De Aza raced back near the wall in center and hauled in the drive for out No. 2. First baseman Paul Konerko made a diving stop and perfect toss to Reed on Stephen Drew’s hard-hit grounder to finish things off, but the late story of this one was the homers that weren’t.

During a seventh inning for Matt Thornton where the left-hander’s streak of 11 straight appearances without allowing an earned run came to an end, the Red Sox scored twice and once again appeared to have the shot to tie it when Jarrod Saltalamacchia connected with Middlebrooks on second. This time, it was left fielder Dayan Viciedo who drifted near the wall in left-center and made the inning-ending, wind-aided grab.

“You know, the way the wind was blowing, it’s not easy going to left or center when it cuts across like that,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “I said it earlier, this ballpark the flags are almost the opposite. Those are hard places when it’s real windy like tonight.”

So, while the flags made it look as if the wind was howling out to left as the night went on, it actually was knocking down fly balls in that direction. That misdirection is why Reed never looks at the flags when he takes the mound.

“There’s balls that they hit that you think are pop ups and they fly over the wall,” Reed said. “Then Middlebrooks got all of it and they stay in the park. The wind must be circling around the stadium. I don’t know how it dictates like where it’s blowing. He hit it and he hit it well, but at the end of the day it stayed in the park.”

What started with a few terse curse words from Reed, ended in the 16th victory he had a hand in this season. And what was his reaction when the ball landed in De Aza’s glove?

“Just kind of a little smirk on my face and glad it stayed in,” Reed said. “A good feeling when I saw De Aza camp under it on the warning track.”

Game 17: Angels knock out Danks

TEMPE, Ariz. – An Angels’ lineup featuring Mike Trout, Albert Pujols, Josh Hamilton and Mark Trumbo, among others, could do damage against many pitchers even at the top of their game. In Thursday’s 12-4 White Sox loss, it was John Danks and his road back to the Majors that got taken down over 3 1/3 innings. Here’s a look.

HOME RUN: Tyler Flowers feels good at the plate and backed up that Thursday morning analysis with a strong game at Diablo Stadium. Flowers drew a walk in the third off of Jason Vargas after being down 0-2 in the count and scored, doubled to center in the fifth and lined out to center in the seventh.

TRIPLE: Although he’s not front and center in the roster picture, outfielder Blake Tekotte hit the ball hard Thursday. He tripled home one run, marking his second Spring Training three-bagger, and then added a second RBI with a ninth-inning sacrifice fly.

DOUBLE: Jordan Danks didn’t start Thursday’s game but knocked out two hits and drove in a run as a replacement for Dewayne Wise. It was Wise who drove home the team’s second run with a sixth-inning homer off of left-handed throwing Scott Downs.

SINGLE: A single for Hector Gimenez in the ninth leaves him at 9-for-16 for the spring. All nine hits have been singles.

STOLEN BASE: As the leadoff hitter in the fourth inning, the left-handed hitting Adam Dunn tried to lay down a bunt on the first pitch from left-handed throwing Vargas. The bunt attempt went foul. Dunn, who has 406 career homers, launched the next pitch toward the left field stands but it was hauled in against the wall by left fielder Vernon Wells.

CALLED THIRD: Danks worked 3 1/3 innings, which represents his longest 2013 Cactus League outing to date, and felt good despite allowing six earned runs on seven hits. He focused on the changeup, using it to strikeout Howie Kendrick and Trumbo in the first, but did so in part because that pitch was working the best for him.

He also benefitted from facing as strong of a lineup as the Angels.

“For me especially, I need to see lineups like this down here. Just because more than anyone else in camp, I’m needing to see reactions, and how guys are taking pitches,” Danks said “I just need to kind of get it going a little more — some of these other guys can go out there and just get their work in, and certainly I’m doing the same thing. But I’m hoping to see progress each time.

“I don’t feel like I can really do that unless I’m facing big league hitters. Without a doubt, that’s one of the better lineups we’ll see this year. Wish it could’ve gone a little better.”

White Sox manager Robin Ventura pointed out the good news is that Danks is not hurting, although the White Sox would like slightly better results from their left-hander.

“Once you start getting knocked around a little, it kicked in and he picked it up a little bit,” said Ventura of Danks. “Even though it’s Spring Training, you’d like to see a little bit better than this.”

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE: The White Sox are 3-for-20 with runners in scoring position over their past two losses. Jhan Marinez also was touched up for four runs on one hit and three walks in the seventh, but they were all unearned because of Tekotte’s dropped fly ball in center.

Game 15: Sale sails through five

GLENDALE, Ariz. – Low-scoring pitchers’ battles are unusual bordering on unlikely in Arizona, but Monday’s 3-1 victory for the White Sox over the Rockies fit into that category. Here’s a look.

HOME RUN: It’s as rare to see a Cactus League complete game as it is to see a torrential downpour in the desert. But Chris Sale was on that pace Monday, needing just 32 pitches to complete three innings and 50 over five. He struck out two, didn’t issue a walk and allowed one run on three hits over five-plus innings and 58 pitches.

“He looked great,” said White Sox manager Robin Ventura of Sale. “He got it going and stretched it out today, going into the sixth. He feels good and looks fine.”

“Every time that I go out there, my goal in mind is throwing strikes and attacking the zone,” Sale said. “I didn’t walk anybody. So, that’s where I want to be.”

TRIPLE: Another Cactus League game, another long home run for Paul Konerko who served as the designated hitter Monday. Konerko now has five long balls and has been making solid contact since Day 1.

DOUBLE: Jared Mitchell finished 0-for-2 with a walk at the plate on Monday but showed off other parts of his skill-set. Mitchell swiped second in the second and then made a nice running catch against the left field wall to start the fourth on a blast by Eric Young. Mitchell won’t break camp with the White Sox but certainly has impressed with his Spring Training play.

SINGLE: Gordon Beckham knocked out two hits. Angel Sanchez, who started at shortstop, tripled, singled and scored a run.

STOLEN BASE: If you arrived late for this particular contest, you potentially missed a good portion of the action. The time of game was 2:13.

CALLED THIRD: Ramon Troncoso turned in another strong outing, with the veteran reliever finishing the victory via a scoreless ninth. It might be tough for the right-hander to crack the White Sox opening bullpen alignment, barring injury, but he gives the team another strong option if needed.

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE: The White Sox could have scored more than one run in the third if not for Jordan Danks getting picked off third by Rockies catcher Yorvit Torrealba with runners on first and third, nobody out and Adam Dunn at the plate. Dunn then gave Sale a chance for early postgame stretching, when the left-hander had to contort to catch Dunn’s throw on Todd Helton’s inning-ending grounder to first in the fifth.

Game 12: Rough day for the pitchers

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Saturday’s 11-9 victory for the Diamondbacks over the White Sox had the feel of Opening Day in Chicago, if only for that fact that game-time temperature was 50 degrees. Here’s a look at the action.

HOME RUN: Without even asking Paul Konerko, it’s safe to say that the White Sox captain won’t base anything on Cactus League results. But the fact remains that the first baseman has been hitting the ball hard through the first 13 games of action: including the exhibition with Team USA. He singled in his first at-bat Saturday, giving him seven straight at-bats with hits, and then after lining out to center, launched a three-run homer in the fifth. Konerko is hitting .409 to date.

TRIPLE: Jared Mitchell continues to impress this spring, adding a triple and single to his resume in Scottsdale and raising his average to .450. He also showed more signs of his great speed with a stolen base.

DOUBLE: For the White Sox to take off this season, they are going to need better production from Alexei Ramirez. It’s a fact Ramirez has talked about, despite having a pretty good season statistically in 2012, commensurate with his past production. Ramirez showed his run-producing ability with a two-run double in the second among his two hits.

SINGLE: Josh Bell continued his strong spring with a two-run homer off of Brandon McCarthy in the second. Jeff Keppinger added two hits, raising his average to .476.

STOLEN BASE: The “getting in my work” theory applied to Matt Thornton’s afternoon, as he allowed six runs on five hits over two-thirds of an inning. Thornton laughed about being lucky that the White Sox don’t face Arizona this season but even better news for the left-hander is that the game took place just 10 minutes from his family’s new home. After a rough day of work, it was at least a short ride back to the family.

CALLED THIRD: It was a rough day for the pitchers, but Hector Santiago pitched well over two scoreless innings. He struck out two, allowed two hits and walked two. Nestor Molina also had a solid day at the B Game loss to the Indians, throwing three scoreless innings with one strikeout.

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE: John Danks struggled during his second Cactus League start, but as Bill Murray once said in the movie Meatballs, it just doesn’t matter. Well, it matters because as Danks said, he never likes getting hit around. But right now the process is far more important than the results in Danks’ comeback from Aug. 6 arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Danks’ location just wasn’t there on Saturday.

“It just will take time for Johnny to get sharper and get that control you need to do it,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “He’s not happy with today either. You just keep working on it. I think he’s going to get it. Right now it’s just not there.

“He goes out and gets stronger each time. Again, it’s not what he wanted but we’re going to see what it looks like tomorrow and the next day and go from there.”

Game 10: Danks for the comeback

GLENDALE, Ariz. – The story of Monday’s 6-2 victory for the White Sox over the Giants was John Danks’ return to game action after Aug. 6 arthroscopic surgery, John Danks’ successful return to game action and then John Danks feeling good about his successful return. But there was more to the action at Camelback Ranch then John Danks. Here’s a look.

HOME RUN: It’s only one start. Just like it was only one bullpen session and then just one live batting practice. But Danks continues to leave the White Sox hopeful that he will make a significant and important contribution to the 2013 season.

Danks threw two-plus innings Monday, using 35 pitches, of which 27 were strikes. He hung a changeup to Joaquin Arias in the first inning but it was also the third changeup he threw in that particular at-bat. Danks was upbeat and smiling postgame, pretty much the same attitude he’s featured since SoxFest. The true test will be how Danks feels Tuesday after this effort, but if it’s “all good,” as Danks said Monday, then the Diamondbacks on Saturday become his next target.

“We had that start point and now… . It was fun actually, we were talking about a couple of game situations there,” said White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper of Danks. “He hung a changeup to the one guy and that was it. Could not have went any better.”

TRIPLE: Jeff Keppinger made his second start at third base, after the White Sox limited him early to the designated hitter role when he dealt with a sore shoulder. Keppinger showed no rust in the field and even less at the plate, with two singles off of Ryan Vogelsong and a third off of Matt Cain. Keppinger is 7-for-15 during Cactus League action.

DOUBLE: Dewayne Wise’s three-run homer capped a four-run fourth and held up as the game-winning hit. What’s more important is the left-handed hitting presence Wise brings to this lineup, not to mention solid defense in all three outfield positions.

SINGLE: Blake Tekotte tripled among his two hits and scored a run. Alexei Ramirez doubled home Tekotte. Angel Sanchez singled and scored a run, and Josh Phegley knocked out his third Cactus League double.

STOLEN BASE: The definition of utility player has been Brent Morel during Spring Training. He has played third base, shortstop and got in at first base during Monday’s victory.

CALLED THIRD: From the fifth through the seventh innings, Donnie Veal (three) and Simon Castro (five) combined to strike out eight of nine hitters.

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE: Hard to find fault in this one. White Sox hitters even finished 4-for-10 with runners in scoring position.

Game 8: Almost Perfect

GLENDALE, Ariz. – The White Sox threw a perfect game against the Reds in their 4-0 victory Saturday. Well, perfect for 3 2/3 innings until Joey Votto doubled off of second pitcher in Hector Santiago, because of course the starting pitcher, Jose Quintana, wasn’t going over his limit during Cactus League start No. 1. Here’s a look at the game.

HOME RUN: Quintana couldn’t have done much more over three perfect innings. He only went to a pair of three-ball counts and needed just 39 pitches to get through three innings.

“You get our pitchers going out there, the guys you are familiar seeing, and Quintana goes out and looks great,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “He looks fresh and it’s nice to see him go out there and continue.”

TRIPLE: A couple of different aspects of Jared Mitchell’s game were on display Saturday. He blooped a double into center in the second off of Bronson Arroyo and his great speed left him with serious designs on third even though the ball didn’t bounce too far away, before he pulled up at second. And in the fourth, the left-handed hitter launched an opposite-field shot to left-center.

“You’re giving a guy like him that playing time and let him see what he can do and Mitch is a strong kid,” Ventura said. “You look at the tools that are there and there are a lot of tools to work with. He starts adding that in. It’s just a plus.”

DOUBLE: Conor Gillaspie produced his second homer in Cactus League action and his seventh RBI. He also played first without an issue, adding to his versatility.

SINGLE: The young middle infield combination of Carlos Sanchez and Marcus Semien each knocked out a hit, with Sanchez driving in a run. Jeff Keppinger returned defensively to third base, and Brent Morel handled two chances flawlessly as the starting shortstop for the day.

STOLEN BASE: Let’s give this honor to a fan late in the game who started a one-man chant of ‘Let’s Go Sox.’ When nobody joined in, he added “I don’t hear anybody else” and then the rest of the fans picked up the cheer.

CALLED THIRD: Quintana set the tone for the day with his three innings, but Santiago followed up strong. He allowed two walks and one hit over two scoreless innings, approaching this appearance like another start, even though he came in after Quintana.

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE: The Reds stole two bases, and Josh Phegley was charged with a passed ball. Very minor hiccups in an otherwise strong day for the White Sox.

Game 7: Sale(ing) away and Viciedo’s blast

GOODYEAR, Ariz. – The story of Friday’s 9-7 victory for the Indians was Chris Sale’s strong debut and a barrage of home runs by both teams. Here’s a look inside the game.

HOME RUN: Oh, if only they gave distances on Cactus League home runs. The folks at Goodyear Ballpark literally would have had to break out the tape measure for Dayan Viciedo’s blast leading off the second against Justin Masterson. It cleared the left field fence, at 345 feet, sailed over the people sitting on the lawn and then cleared the back fence. A best guess was somewhere between 460 to 500 feet.

Brent Morel couldn’t quite match Viciedo’s feat of strength, but hit his own two-run shot off of Masterson following Hector Gimenez’s single. The difference between Morel’s exceptional play this spring and back-pain induced hesitancy last spring is quite noticeable.

TRIPLE: Gimenez knocked out another three hits, leaving him at 5-for-7 in Cactus League action. But of greater importance was the catcher’s ability to settle down Sale after he was out of rhythm in the first. The role of the White Sox catchers is handling the pitchers first and offense second.

DOUBLE: For those who say the White Sox are thin in middle infield prospects, they might want to check out Marcus Semien’s early play. He belted a three-run homer and made a couple of slick plays at shortstop. He has turned in an impressive overall start in Cactus League action

SINGLE: Carlos Sanchez made the defensive play of the game, diving in the hole between first and second to take away a Cleveland hit. Gordon Beckham and Alex Rios had one hit apiece.

STOLEN BASE: Although his sore right elbow is not quite healthy enough to allow him to play the field, Jordan Danks singled and swiped a base as Friday’s starting designated hitter. Danks will need to show a little more than his exceptional outfield defense to help lock down that final roster spot.

CALLED THIRD: Sale wasn’t exactly perfect during his first Cactus League start. But the fact that the 23-year-old was pleased with his effort stands as a good sign, since he’s his own worst critic.

JUST A BIT OUTSIDE: After an impressive start in which he allowed one run over three innings, Erik Johnson was touched up for five runs on five hits over 1 1/3 innings of relief. Matt Carson took him deep.

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