Little move, big impact

Does anyone remember Geoff Blum?

Well, anyone and everyone who follows the White Sox will never forget his game-winning home run in the 14th inning of Game 3 of the 2005 World Series?

Or how about Bobby Jenks? Well, of course, White Sox supporters know all about one of the game’s best closers. But what these two players have in common is that they were both considered minor moves at the time Ken Williams and his staff brought them into the organization, and they eventually paid huge dividends.

So, when talk of Jake Peavy and Roy Oswalt and any other frontline player comes up in association with the White Sox, remember some times it’s the lesser-known moves that have the greatest impact in pushing the South Siders to the postseason.

Take a gander at Williams’ thought process behind the Ramon Castro weekend deal to further illustrate this point.

“Let’s take the catching situation. The thought behind that was here’s an upgrade across the board. Corky was doing a nice job catching the pitchers and fit in well,” Williams said. “However, if that offensive difference became such that we got into antoher situation where we weren’t swinging the bats well, is Ozzie then hesitant to give AJ those days games after night games or certain lefties where he can get his legs back underneath him?

“You have an offensive catching hole from the backup and then AJ might decline because of fatigue. When you decline because of fatigue, it’s not just offensively but it’s sharpness defensively and taking care of the pitching staff.”

Castro not only becomes an upgrade over Miller with the bat, but also gives Ozzie Guillen greater flexibility with A.J. Pierzynski. So, little moves could mean a lot.

“Sometimes, it’s about the marginal deal, where you get five percent better,” Williams said.

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3 Comments

Ross Goad and Geoff Blum were two of my favorite players in that ’05 season. I was sad to see both of them leave.

As sad as I was that we missed out on Peavy, looking back on it, I’m kind of glad we didn’t get him. I like the way our rotation is right now (other than Colon) and a big-name guy like that could only mess things up. Nobody ever hears about Clayton Richard and yet he’s one of the best 5-slot pitchers we have. If Peavy was on the club, where would Richard be? He’s good out of the ‘pen but he’s an even better starter.

Never even heard the Oswalt rumors!

Great post, Scott. You have a new loyal reader.

- Anders http://chisoxboy.mlblogs.com/

RE: Little Move, Big Impact / Scott Podsednik

On June 13 1983 the Angels beat the White Sox 7- 4 and the Sox record was 27- 32. After the game Roland Hemond traded an unhappy Tony Bernazard for fast, make it happen on the bases Julio Cruz. After the trade the White Sox won 10 of their next 12 and finished the season 72 – 31. They won the division by 20 games, clinching the division title on Sept 17 with Julio Cruz scoring the winning run on a walk off sacrifice fly by Harold Baines. One player can impact an entire team and change the way everyone plays.

SPEED KILLS!!! (and does not slump) The Sox scored 23 runs in sweeping Kansas City on only ONE HOME RUN!!

With the White Sox trying to trade for all-star veteran pitchers, why dont they go after someone who isnt even on a team. Pedro Martinez pitched outstanding in the WBC. We wouldnt have to give up any players, i think the sox should go for it

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